Home News Harvey Historic Harvey spares San Marcos

Historic Harvey spares San Marcos

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Photo by Shayan Faradineh

Harvey, both as a hurricane and tropical storm, canceled classes, interrupt resident’s power, pushed back sorority recruitment and flooded into resident’s halls.

Harvey started as a tropical storm Friday, and continues to cause devastation in Houston and other parts of East Texas, into Louisiana.

The city of San Marcos took precautionary steps to the weather by opening the emergency operations center Saturday through Monday morning. The center acted as a 24/7 staffed hotline for non-emergency disaster-related questions.

After the day of heavy rainfalls, the San Marcos Activity Center opened at 11:30 p.m. for residents to take shelter. One resident and three travelers utilized the shower, bathrooms and open area rooms.

Laureen Chernow, Hays County public information officer, said the center was prepared for whatever course the storm took.

“We are prepared for all kinds of issues: downed trees, power lines, flooding and power outages,” Chernow said. “The weather service indicated that our area could get more wind and more flooding this weekend. Right now, things are manageable, but we are concerned about the uncertainty of the storm.”

Prior to landfall in Rockport, Tropical Storm Harvey evolved into a category 4 hurricane. The National Weather Service reported winds of 55 mph would hit San Marcos.

Due to early weather reporting, President Denise Trauth emailed students Friday, canceling classes on Aug. 28. Texas State canceled activities beginning at 5 p.m. Friday and throughout the weekend. New Student Convocation, the finale of Bobcat Preview, was canceled.

San Marcos remained under flash flood warning until 4:45 a.m. Sunday.

Although San Marcos didn’t flood as expected, rainfalls and high speed winds created power outages for over 500 residents in San Marcos, nearly two percent of the city’s utility customers.

Kristi Wyatt, communications director for the city of San Marcos, said the power outages were related to the fallen trees and debris effecting power lines.

“The city expects to double the number of tree trimming crews Monday,” Wyatt said. “The wet conditions and wind will lead to more downed trees and additional outages over the next several days.”

Also, due to weather conditions, the first day of recruitment was canceled. The recruitment registration was extended until Aug. 30.

Students living on campus experience flooding Sunday morning.

Matt Flores, university spokesperson, said custodial and maintenance staff responded to the flooding concerns in residential life.

“The most affected is College Inn,” Flores said. “Our Residence Life staff has been responding to work orders, and crews have been working on cleaning up and trying to eliminate leaks. In some cases, we have relocated affected students to other residence hall rooms.”

Ahead of landfall, Gov. Greg Abbott request President Donald Trump to label Hurricane Harvey as a major disaster declaration. The declaration would allow the Federal Emergency Management Agency to assist Texas in disaster prevention and post-storm rebuilding.

The White House Press Secretary told reporters President Trump would be in Texas on Tuesday.

Although Hurricane Harvey was downgraded to a tropical storm, Houston has received severe flooding and rainfall. Gov. Greg Abbott issued the full Texas’ National Guard in response, making the total deployment 12,000.

Sixteen fatalities have been confirmed. The effects of the storm are still unfolding.

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